INTHEBLACK July 2020 - Page 3



INTHEBLACK
// D I G I TA L T R A N S F O R M AT I O N
T H E S T R AT E G I S T
// V E E N A S A H A J WA L L A
TRARA
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// V E E N A S A H A J WA L L A
making and how they got the liquid chocolate to become
that solid slab and all the challenges there must have been
to get it right.”
That early interest in materials science led Sahajwalla to
study engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology,
where she was the only woman in her class. She went
on to earn her master’s degree at the University of
British Columbia and, while completing her PhD at
20
2020
LY
JULY
JU
the University of Michigan
in 20
the
early 1990s, she was
offered a job at Australia’s national science and research
agency, CSIRO.
making and how they
got the liquid chocolate to become
WHEELS IN MOTION
stint at the CSIRO
led to must
a research
role been
that solid slab andSahajwalla’s
all the challenges
there
have
UURRofEE the
the University of NSW, and it was
FFUinUTTone
to get it right.” atuniversity’s
laboratories that she pioneeredCher
Green
UUSS
FFOOCSahajwalla
Steelin
technology.
That early interest
materials sciencetyres
led
to
ld
or
ld
w
r
or
w
ou
r
In Australia, 50 million vehicle
reach
the end
s
ou
ay
s
Way
W
forrrecycled.
ge
fo
study engineering ofattheir
thelifeIndian
Institute
of
Technology,
an
ge
each year, and
only
16
per
cent
are
ch
an
ill
ch
w
will
ercarbonbe
tttter
technology involves melting
down
theebe
th
where she was the Sahajwalla’s
only woman
in her class.
She
went
rich rubber tyres to replace some of the non-renewable
coke in the
production
steel.
on to earn her master’s
degree
at ofthe
University of
Rubber is cheaper than coke. It also creates O
TTWith
OOOless
British Columbia and,
while
completing
at
FFPhD
StoSTTindustry.
BBEEher
waste, which
represents
a cost saving
their
valuable
molecules
extracted
in
a
lab,
millions
D ofwas
R
A
D
the University of Michigan in the early 1990s,
she
R
W
A
R
O
W
F
R
O
F
rubber tyres have been diverted from landfill thanks
to to
rnresearch
to
turn
re
tu
offered a job at Australia’s
national science
and
hattre
Wha
Sahajwalla’s innovation.
W
ill
w
ill
ce
w
ce
offi
e
thit’s
“When we talk about recycling,
generally about
e offi
th
agency, CSIRO. converting
likee
oklik
look
lo
like for like – converting a plastic
bottle
WE’RE L
A
I
C
E
P
S
TURNING
I S S UE
THE PAGE
into another plastic bottle, for instance – but this is
quite limited,” Sahajwalla says. “Old tyres are no longer
roadworthy, so they can’t be reused as tyres again. What
see that old tyre
a collection
of molecules
Sahajwalla’s stint atif you
thecanCSIRO
ledasto
a research
role
that can be extracted and used in other manufacturing
at the University ofsolutions?”
NSW, and it was in one ofgu
the
idee
id
TT
LPPRRIINN
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r’sgu
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AS T H E W O R L D AWA I T S W H AT L I E S B E YO N D
THE CLIFF-HANGER THAT IS 2020, INTHEBLACK
I S E XC I T E D T O A N N O U N C E I T S N E X T C H A P T E R .
S
ince its beginnings as the
Commonwealth Journal
of Accountancy in 1909,
this magazine has undergone
several transformations – all with
the aim of delivering high-quality,
trusted content to accounting and
finance professionals in Australia
and overseas.
The digital transformation
of our work and personal lives,
already well under way and
pushed into overdrive by the
current global crisis, will see
INTHEBLACK evolve once again,
as we leave paper and ink behind
and embrace a new format.
This issue of INTHEBLACK will
be our last print edition.
It will also mark the launch of an
enhanced digital flipbook that
offers readers a familiar magazine
format, as well as myriad
interactive and immersive features,
8 ITB July 2020
PPOOSSIITTIIVVEE
DDIISSRRUUPPTTIIOONN
Inside
In
noww, ,
university’s laboratories
that she pioneered
Green
buyyno
toher
bu
POWER OF COLLABORATION to
terr
payylalate
pa
Prize for
Steel technology. In 2005, Sahajwalla won the prestigious Eureka
her Green Steel invention and, while she describes it as a
In Australia, 50 “wonderful
million outcome”,
vehiclethetyres
reach
thewas
end
scientific
recognition
not
enough.
s
a
of theirhlife
each
year,
and
only
16
per
cent
are
recycled.
s
id
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id
’s
M
lla
’s
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lla
jw
a
“I wanted to use the research outcomes to create
Sahaajw
enaaSa
VeSahajwalla’s
en
reinvolves
Ve
sure
ea
su
technology
melting
down
carbontotrtrea
sustainable
industry practices,”
she says.
“I needed
to be
sh
to
strtraash
rn
s
tu
rn
tu
ch
u
ch
to
u
to show the
steel industry
thatnon-renewable
the benefits were not
to rich rubber tyres toablereplace
some
of
the
just environmental, but also economic.”
coke in the production
of steel.
Fast-forward
more than a decade, and Sahajwalla has
visited countless manufacturing centres across the country
Rubber is cheaper
than
coke.
It alsoand
creates
to promote the environmental
economicless
benefits of
green manufacturing.
She saysto
engaging
with theWith
business
waste, which represents
a cost saving
industry.
community has been vital to getting her innovations to
their valuable molecules
extracted
in
a
lab,
millions
of
market.
“We don’t
need a scientific
collaborator,”
she says. “We
rubber tyres have been
diverted
from
landfill
thanks
to
need [industry] partners who are open to trying new
Sahajwalla’s innovation.
products and seeing the benefits in the longer term.”
Michael Sharpe, director at the Advanced
“When we talk about
recycling, it’s generally about
converting like for32like

converting a plastic bottle
ITB July 2020
into another plastic bottle, for instance – but this is
quite limited,” Sahajwalla says. “Old tyres are no longer
roadworthy, so they can’t be reused as tyres again. What
if you can see that old tyre as a collection of molecules
that can be extracted and used in other manufacturing
solutions?”
Y
R
A
N
O
I
T
U
L
R E VO
R E C Y CL ER
on a platform that is rich,
eco-friendly and accessible
on demand.
After long encouraging our
readers to embrace digital
transformation on the pages of
the magazine, we are excited to
see INTHEBLACK take this next
step in its journey.
The new digital flipbook will
significantly reduce the magazine’s
environmental impact, to which
POWER
OF COLLABORATION
printing
and distribution
were
Incontributors.
2005, Sahajwalla won the prestigious Eureka Prize for
major
heralso
Green
invention and, while she describes it as a
It will
haveSteel
new features
outcome”,
the scientific recognition was not
many“wonderful
of our readers
have been
enough.
asking
for – the ability to share
INTHEBLACK
content
withthe research outcomes to create
“I wanted
to use
colleagues
and
clients,
easypractices,”
links
sustainable industry
she says. “I needed to be
to relevant
resources,
and
the
able to show the steel industry that the benefits were not
ability
to environmental,
access the magazine
just
but also economic.”
contentFast-forward
anytime, anywhere.
more than a decade, and Sahajwalla has
THE
FLIPBOOK
W I L L H AV E:
visited countless manufacturing centres across the country
to promote the environmental and economic benefits of
green manufacturing. She says engaging with the business
Caption
“WASTE IS NOT A
PROBLEM TO BE
MANAGED; IT’S
AN OPPORTUNITY
TO BE EXPLORED.”
Q&A WITH
THE INVENTOR
What is the greatest lesson
you’ve learned in your career?
The more people think that
something is impossible, the more
likely that a solution can be found
if you put your mind to it.
You are an inventor. What does
a “eureka” moment feel like?
It’s absolutely exhilarating. Even
if it doesn’t present the complete
solution to a problem, discovering
you think may work leads to the
next step. It’s a great feeling. You
get goosebumps.
What are you currently reading?
I’m reading The Cattle King by Ion
Idriess, which is about (Australian
pastoralist) Sir Sidney Kidman and
how he built his cattle empire. It
captures the Australian spirit.
Did you develop any new routines
during the COVID-19 lockdown?
The lack of clear routine has been
good for me. It means that I have
had more fabulous thinking time,
because I haven’t been caught in
traffic, driving to and from work.
Do you have any advice for
budding innovators?
When you challenge the norm,
you will have the spirit of
innovation in you. Don’t ever
let it die! People might think
you’re crazy because your ideas
are different, but don’t let it
bother you.
Manufacturing Growth Centre, says Sahajwalla
“understands the path to commercialisation and
what it takes to be successful”.
“Veena and I have walked the factory floors in
places like Dubbo and Armidale to talk about
robotics and automation, and we’ve spoken with
manufacturers in Perth and Adelaide about the
benefits of recycling and the circular economy,” he
says.
“At every point, Veena is open about the
possibilities that exist for manufacturers, and
this has led to companies coming in from across
Australia to visit her at UNSW’s SMaRT
Centre to investigate ways of developing new
technologies. Veena knows what it takes to have a
go, but, most importantly, how to have a beneficial
impact.”
IT WILL
THE MICROFACTORY
A L L O WOF THE FUTURE
Many of these new manufacturing technologies
are being developed
R E AviaDSahajwalla’s
E R S unique
microfactory model.
Microfactories
feature
T O A CaCseries
E SofSsmall machines
and devices that use patented technology to
perform one or more functions in the reforming
QUALITY
of waste products into new and usable resources.
They can be installed in an area as small as 50
MandA can
G AbeZsetIupNwherever
E waste
square metres,
is stockpiled, such as a building site or alongside
Cdisposal
O N Tsites
E Nto Tprocess
O Nwaste at the
regional waste
source.
SahajwallaAsaysPthe
Cmicrofactory
, TA B Lmodel
E Tmay
disrupt the current highly centralised, vertically
integrated industrial
O R Mmodel.
OBILE
“If you can localise your solution, you’ve actually
PHONE.
HEADLINE
HERE
enabled everybody across the country to benefit,”
she says.
The first microfactory was launched at UNSW
with funding Sahajwalla received from the
Australia Research Council (ARC), to convert
electronic waste input into new products.
Electronic devices are broken down and scanned
The Australian Council of
by a robotic module to identify useful parts, which
Recycling and the Waste
Management and Resource
are then transformed into valuable materials.
Recovery Association of
Computer circuit boards, for example, can be
Australia (WMRR) estimate a
turned into valuable metal alloys such as copper,
A$150 million investment by
while plastics can be converted into filaments for
Caption
federal and state governments
3D printing, which Sahajwalla describes as a “costis required to reboot the local
effective” alternative.
recycling industry and foster the
E-waste microfactory industry partners include
creation of a circular economy.
MolyCop, e-waste recycler TES, and spectacle
Sahajwalla says green
manufacturer Dresden, which makes its frames
manufacturing is a vital part of
from recycled plastics.
the circular economy. In
A second microfactory was launched at UNSW
addition to her role at UNSW
last year, to transform waste materials such as glass
and NSW Circular Economy
and textiles into tiles, ceramics and panels that can
Innovation Network, she also
be used for building products and furniture.
heads the ARC Industrial
Industry partner Mirvac has used Sahajwalla’s
Transformation Research Hub
ceramic tiles in its new apartment complex in
for green manufacturing, which
Sydney’s Marrickville.
HEAD OF
BEYOND
works in collaboration with
THE CLASS
FACE VALUE
Diana Sarcasmo, general manager design,
industry to ensure new science
marketing and sales at Mirvac, says the partnership
is translated into real-world
is part of the company’s sustainability strategy
environmental and economic
to achieve zero waste to landfill by 2030. The
benefits.
Marrickville project is located on the site of an
Green manufacturing aims to
transform traditional business
old hospital, with 90 per cent of construction
and manufacturing practices –
waste recycled. This includes the textiles from
and the mindset of stakeholders
old hospital garments, which were used in the
– to reduce the industrial
production of the tiles in Sahajwalla’s microfactory.
impact on climate change and
“Veena is incredibly engaging and passionate,”
other environmental concerns.
2019 CAREER Mirvac
OUTLOOK
Sarcasmo
says. “She’s a true collaborator.”
Manufacturing
Growth
Centre,
says Sahajwalla
TECH, TALENT & CHANGE
Sahajwalla
thinks about green
is looking to set up its own microfactory on one
manufacturing as “reforming”
of its building
sites. “The whole
idea path
of having
“understands
the
toa commercialisation
and
rather
than
simply
recycling.
local plant is that we wouldn’t be using transport,
“You’re not necessarily
what
it
takes
to
be
successful”.
so we could recycle what we’ve got onsite and then
converting something into the
keep it onsite,
so that weand
can tap
the circular
“Veena
I into
have
walked the
factory
floors
same
product, but
rather in
economy,” says Sarcasmo.
reforming
it into about
something
places
like
Dubbo
and
Armidale
to
talk
This is exactly what Sahajwalla had hoped for her
else,” she says. “There’s a huge
microfactory
model. The
global
rollout has alreadyand we’ve
amount ofspoken
embedded with
value in
robotics
and
automation,
started – Sahajwalla is working with engineers in
things like everyday electronic
in Perth
and Adelaide
about
thewe
India to manufacturers
set up microfactories across
the country.
products, so why shouldn’t
“The value-added part of creating highly valuable
tap into it and
create that value
benefits
of
recycling
and
the
circular
economy,”
he
products [from waste] that can be sold into the
right here in Australia, rather
economysays.
has not quite happened in places like
than sending it away for
India,” she says. “There’s been a lot of front-end
someone else to tap into it? I
“WASTE IS NOT A
PROBLEM TO BE
MANAGED; IT’S
AN OPPORTUNITY
TO BE EXPLORED.”
FEBRUARY 2019
AUDIT NEEDS
MORE SCEPTICS
LEADERSHIP • STRATEGY • BUSINESS
RBA’S IAN HARPER
P01 CP0219 ELLEN Cover FINAL_IMAGING.indd 1
7/1/19 1:28 pm
“At every point, Veena is open
theare really
thinkabout
manufacturers
excited about it – they
possibilities
that
exist
for
manufacturers,
andare
seeing lots of new opportunities
To read the ebook A Complaint is a Gift: Recovering Customer Loyalty When Things
CPA
coming
the pipeline.”
led to companies coming
indown
from
across
Go Wrong by Janelle Barlow and Clausthis
Moller,has
visit: cpaaustralia.com.au/library
LIBRARY
Australia to visit her at UNSW’s SMaRT
View rich
Centre to investigate ways of developing
new
intheblack.com July 2020 33
What is the greatest
lesson
interactive
content,
technologies.
Veena
knows
what
it
takes
to
have a
video,
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THE MICROFACTORY OF THE FUTURE
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Many of to
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What
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and
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High-quality
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additional resources
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Sahajwalla says the microfactory model may
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disrupt
the current highly
centralised,
intheblack.com
July vertically
2020 9
Have you developed any new
utemperspit prem et
integrated
industrial
model.
routines during the COVID-19
BREAKOUT
HEADING HERE
H I S T O RY O F
POSITIVE CHANGE

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