James.qxp May June 2019 web - Page 35



















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mn

Republican policies of limited government, lower
I also want to give a big shout out to
taxes and personal responsibility are the best
Republican National Chairman Ronna Romney
n
i
a
e
ingredients to fuel our wonderful and
McDaniel, who continues to break records
l
cD
M
amazing country.
in fundraising and continues to make

ey
In Georgia, I hope we handily resure Republicans across the country
elect U.S. Sen. David Perdue, who has
have the necessary resources to win in
been an outstanding lawmaker and
2020. She did such an outstanding job
has stood staunchly with the
in her first term that the president
president. We also need to take back
asked her to run again to be at the
the 6th U.S. Congressional District,
helm through 2020. I am so honored to
which incumbent Karen Handel lost by
be a part of the 168 members of the
a very small margin.
Republican National Committee under
Republicans will also target some
her strong leadership!
state House of Representatives seats we
It would take me an entire magazine to
lost last November. After all, Republicans
list all of President Trump’s
in the General Assembly passed needed
achievements, but consider just a few
legislation ranging from the
highlights. The president grew our
“heartbeat” abortion bill to allowing
economy, fought for the underdogs,
the governor to secure federal
rolled back red tape, unleashed
Medicaid waivers to insure more
American energy and kept Americans
middle- and low-income Georgians.
safe. While the Democrats are busy
We can win with a lot of hard work
battling it out for who will be their
and determination because we have the
presidential candidate, President Trump

best message. Let’s just be happy
is doing the business of the American




warriors
delivering it!
people. Yet we do have work to do, and we
e

Perdu
must reach to the masses (especially suburban
Atlanta businesswoman Ginger Howard is Georgia’s Republican
women and the millennials) with the truth that our
















National Committeewoman.
34
JAMES
M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 9
hey’d just witnessed the closest
election in Georgia history, where
the hard work of Democratic
candidates and organizers resulted in
record numbers of voters turning out to make
their voices heard and asking for their
government to reflect them. Stacey Abrams may not
have ended up in the governor’s mansion, but the
diverse, strong coalition she helped to build brought her
closer than any Democrat in Georgia history— and
flipped 13 state legislative seats and a Congressional
district in the process.
After Election Day, voters continued to stand up for
the issues they saw
represented by Georgia
Democrats on the
campaign trail: advocating
to finally expand Medicaid,
protesting against
discrimination, and calling
for all votes to be counted.
The people made
themselves clear:
November 6th may have
passed, but they weren’t
going anywhere.
So in January,
Republicans in the General
Assembly had a choice to
make. Do they include the
voices of newly
empowered Georgians, or do they pass their new
governor’s extreme conservative agenda, unlike that of
any of his predecessors?
Today, looking back at a session that included an
abortion ban bill, failure to support business friendly
policies, and continued refusal to fully expand Medicaid,
it is all too clear the choice that Republicans made— and
all too clear why they will lose in November 2020.
In Georgia and across the nation, Democrats made
incredible strides and won in 2018 by listening to the
people, and speaking to the issues directly
impacting their lives. People of all communities
turned out to vote because for the first time, they
felt like their voices mattered. Throughout the fall,
Democratic candidates were talking about healthcare,
education, and economic opportunity— issues directly
making a difference in people’s lives.
This year’s legislative session, led by a whittleddown Republican majority, came in stark contrast to the
campaign. Led by Brian Kemp, Republicans made
extreme legislation the center of their agenda, instead
of focusing on shared issues and the economy like in
years past. Most notably, they made Georgia infamous
across the nation for
passing HB 481, the bill
that would essentially ban
abortion and harm women
in our state.
Throughout debate on
the abortion ban bill,
stakeholders made the
costs very clear.
Employers, including the
billion dollar film industry,
threatened to leave
Georgia. Doctors testified
that the ban would
threaten women’s lives.
And most importantly, the
majority of Georgians were
against it— as an April poll
revealed, seven out of ten Georgians want to preserve
the standing of Roe v. Wade. In the end, the bill
passed— by only one vote.
While Republicans focused on the extreme abortion
ban, what might be even more telling is what they chose
to overlook as they stripped away women’s rights. In 2019,
Republicans failed to pass bills supporting Georgia’s
central industries and employers. They failed to pass longdelayed hate crimes legislation. continued on page 36
M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 9
35

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