James.qxp Nov Dec 2018 web - Page 24



In 2004, Croy left state government to eventually purchase
and head a small Marietta general civil engineering firm with
20 employees. He has since grown that firm to fill offices in
Smyrna, Marietta and Huntsville, Ala.
“We were able to purchase a small firm with 17 employees,
and fortunate enough to grow it to the current 130 employees,”
Croy says. “But we still act like a small company, like one big
family. We also pride ourselves in our extensive knowledge of
the industry, the area and its people.”
Croy also takes pride in his company’s community
involvement, something he stresses to his team members.
It’s about more than money; it’s about being a part of the
community,” said Croy. “It’s about working with schools,
children, veterans. It’s about coming together to help build a
Habitat house for someone in need.
“All of that is very important to me. Cobb County has been
good to us as a company, and I believe in giving back.”
Ask Croy about his favorite projects, and you might expect
a pause as he runs through all the projects he has been
involved with. But that’s not the case. He is quick to answer
that it’s the East-West Connector. “There had been bits and
pieces completed on the project, so in 1993 I set a goal to do
whatever it took to finish the project. We faced a lot of
challenges like permitting and environmental issues. But in
1996, the entire $50 million project was completed.”
He is also proud of the award-winning Skip Spann
Connector. As Cobb County’s first lighted bridge, it serves as
a 416-foot-long link between Frey Road and Busbee Drive over
I-75, which gives commuters improved highway access to
Town Center commercial amenities and Kennesaw State
University (KSU). Pedestrians and bicyclists have improved
access between the KSU campus and the university’s
stadium. Experts say the project helped reduce congestion at
the I-75 and Chastain Road interchange by 19 percent after it
was completed in 1996. The project was named after a figure
who inspired change in the county and the state. (Skip Spann
was a key influence in developing the Town Center CID.)
Croy is also proud of the student competition involved in
the design of the bridge. Three local universities including KSU
held a contest calling for students to submit their design ideas.
The winner: a metal structure that reflects the iconic shape of
the Kennesaw Mountains found nearby and in the KSU logo
that is incorporated into the bridge railing.
Croy’s firm offers transportation, traffic engineering and
operations, program management, survey, photogrammetry,
land acquisition, site development, wastewater, environmental
and construction engineering services. It has further shifted
heavily into aviation and has become the engineer of record for
19 airports. Cobb County clients include KSU and the cities of
Smyrna, Powder Springs, Marietta and Austell— and there are
clients and projects throughout Georgia and in Alabama.
As for the future of Croy Engineering, it looks bright. Just
don’t try to pin him down on retirement plans. “I have a 10-year
plan; I just have not decided when the 10 years start,” he quipped.
Cindy Morley is a staff writer for James and InsiderAdvantage Georgia
ANN HANLON
THE PERIMETER CENTER COMMUNITY
IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTS ARE SEPARATE BUT
JOINTLY-OPERATED SELF-TAXING BUSINESS
DISTRICTS IN THE VIBRANT PERIMETER
CENTER, WITH ONE CID IN DEKALB COUNTY
PORTION OF THE AREA AND THE OTHER ONE
IN THE FULTON COUNTY SECTION. EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR ANN HANLON, WHO HAS A B.A.
FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME AND
A MASTERS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
FROM GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY, WAS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE ALPHARETTABASED NORTH FULTON CID UNTIL SHE WAS
CHOSEN FOR HER PRESENT JOB LAST YEAR.
JAMES MAGAZINE OFTEN FOCUSES ON THE
SIGNIFICANT ECONOMIC ROLE CIDS PLAY IN
GEORGIA, SO WE’RE PLEASED THAT HANLON
GRANTED PUBLISHER PHIL KENT AN INTERVIEW ON HER CID PROGRESS.
24
JAMES
N OV E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 8
PHIL KENT You and your team have accomplished a lot
over the past 12 months, topped off by the completion of
a new Master Consolidated Plan of projects. What were
the motivating factors in completing this plan, and what
is your long-term goal?
ANN HANLON The PCIDs are fast approaching our 20th
anniversary in 2019. Our organization has celebrated
many years of investing in public infrastructure, and we
felt it important to continue that success with a clear
path ahead. In the past year we have been very busy. I
was thrilled to take the helm in July 2017, and we hit the
ground running with a seasoned and respected team. We
brought in proven professionals such as John Gurbal, who
has decades of experience in both Dekalb and Fulton
counties, as our project manager. Part of our development
was to create a master plan that would serve as our blueprint for the next decade. This was especially important
to give each of our 18 board members an opportunity to
provide direction and input from the perspective of the
commercial properties they represent.
It was equally important that we engage all stakeholders in developing the plan, including personal interviews with mayors, City Council members, city managers, public works directors, economic development
directors, the Georgia Department of Transportation, the
Atlanta Regional Commission, the Georgia Regional
Transportation Authority, the State Road and Toll
continued on page 26
N OV E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 8
25

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