year in review 2018 Paperturn - Page 145



2018: A YEAR IN REVIEW | RESEARCH
East Africa, forming in different caves
at the same time, allowing us to directly
relate their sequences and fossils into
a regional sequence,” said Professor
Andy Herries, a co-author of the study
from La Trobe University in Australia.
“This is the most important advance
[to our understanding of human
evolution] to be made since the fossils
themselves were discovered,” said
Professor Bernard Wood of the Center
for the Advanced Study of Human
Paleobiology in the United States.
results revealed that the fossils in
the caves date to six narrow windows
of time between 3.2 million and
1.3 million years ago.
“Now we can link together the
findings from separate caves and
create a better picture of evolutionary
history in southern Africa.”
Up until now, scientists had
considered it impossible to date the
South African fossil record.
“The flowstones in the caves can
act almost like the volcanic layers of
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