SAPICS 2019 Post-Conference Ezine - Page 16



SAPICS E-ZINE SEP 2019
CIRCULAR ECONOMY IS SAVING
THE PLANET & BOOSTING PROFITS
Shoes made from ocean plastics, packaging material made from
mushrooms and a green partnership between Ford and Heinz to build car
parts from tomato fibre are examples of the circular economy in action.
De
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Circular
Economy
ure
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Ma
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Re-use/repair
Sector
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As
Deborah Dull during her presentation at SAPICS 2019.
I
approach to dramatically lengthen the
lifecycle of the items around us”.
n a traditional linear economy,
materials flow in a line; they are taken
from the earth, made into an item in
an affordable way, and waste goes into
landfills when we are finished using the
product. Circular economy has been
inaccurately referred to as “recycling
on steroids”. It was shown to be much
more in an impactful presentation by
United States based supply chain
specialist Deborah Dull at the 2019
SAPICS Conference. She contends that
supply chain management - and the
circular economy - can save the planet.
In her current role as Principal, Supply
Chain Management, at General Electric
subsidiary GE Digital, Dull works across
the supply chain community to accelerate
the transition to a circular economy.
Her goal is to progress past a linear
“take-make-waste” approach to one in
which supply chains around the world
are supporting a “make-reuse circular
“Circular economy is already well under
way around the world and goes beyond
sustainability agendas,” Dull informed
delegates in her presentation.
“The circular economy builds on the
idea of industrial symbiosis where the
idea is that a series of factories are set
up next to each other; the biproduct or
residual product of one factory process is
used as a resource by another. Through
local collaboration, public and private
enterprises buy and sell residual products
from one another, both making money
and saving the environment. With new
Industry 4.0 technologies, the concepts
beyond the industrial symbiosis can be
stretched across digital supply networks,
allowing for materials and byproduct
exchanges to happen at scale.”
15

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