TIR December17.pdf - Page 16



... a family tradition
News Digest
continued from page 15
Pubs are wonderfully social places and have been an
integral part of British society for centuries. But they are under serious threat and hundreds of them have closed, with
more closing every week.
There are multiple problems, alcohol taxes are very high,
business rates are 14 times what they are in Germany and
many pubs are in country locations, where it is necessary
to drive. Police lie in wait down country lanes for drivers
leaving the pubs, so it is essential to have a dedicated driver,
who will not have even one drink.
Many former regulars can’t afford the high prices anymore, so drink at home. The last time I was in Anglesey, in
North Wales, I was sitting in a window seat and an ancient
patron came in and stood nearby, glaring at me for 10 minutes until I became uncomfortable and headed for the door.
As I passed the barman, he said I had been sitting where the
aged patron had sat at every night for more than 50 years
and it had upset him. The locals were all aware, so none of
them would dare trespass.
I grew up in England at a time when the local was the
centre of social interaction and families would go there for a
roast beef Sunday lunch.
It will be a sad day if that disappears, even though it is
now the exception rather than the rule in so many communities, which are therefore no longer as connected as they
used to be.
PS
When I was in Aden many years ago, it was a British Protectorate and the locals and the Yemenis to the north couldn’t
wait to get the Brits out.
I wonder what they are thinking now, as its people are
starving, under siege and dying of cholera. It used to be a
regular stop for the P&O ships operating the UK-Australia
service, which brought commerce and a certain level of
prosperity, although it could never be described as a tourist
destination. The beaches were good but the sharks were
hungry.
A lot of Zimbabweans are now also questioning their
desire to see the back of the British and things may get even
worse.
It is illuminating to look around the world and see which
post-colonial countries are working and thriving and which
are not. One thing is for sure, corruption, incompetence
and failed political ideology defines the countries on the list
which are unsalvageable failures.
Beachcomber Tours showcased the newly renovated
Canonnier Beachcomber Golf Resort & Spa during
an agent educational last month. Consultants were
also given a sneak peek at the new adults-only wing
Victoria for Two at Victoria Beachcomber. Pictured at
Beachcomber Dinarobin Resort and Spa (back, from
left): Genevieve Mahomed, Flight Centre Gateway; Noxi
Ncgobo, Pentravel Pavillion; Tia Mkhize, Pentravel
Galleria; Rachel Naidoo, Flight Centre Amanzimtoti;
Tazlin Stavrinou. Thompsons Durban; Jenna Brooks,
Pentravel Watercrest; Denise Cumming, Harvey World
Shelly Beach and Mano Naicker, Manos Travel with
(front) Wendy Lavis, Flight Centre Musgrave and Pippa
Hackland, Beachcomber Tours.
PS
We all need the Christmas break. Have a good one and I’ll
see you next year in the new TIR.
Agency sales boost
yields says Amadeus
“TRAVEL agents want to
deliver bet ter ser vice to
their customers and reduce
the time spent on mundane
repetitive tasks,” commented Andy Hedley, Amadeus
Southern Africa GTD General Manager.
The GDS has just completed a series of Quality
Managers workshops, providing systems training and
new product highlights.
A ma deus now has t he
largest market share in South
Af rica af ter entering the
market as a competitor to
Galileo and Worldspan 20
years ago. As of September,
Amadeus claimed to have a
43.6 percent global market
share.
Next year, Amadeus will
introduce intuitive searches,
wait listing and useful updates. It is about automation,
increasing productivity and
market share, and providing
the right tools on any channel: offline, online and mobile, Mr. Hedley maintained.
“Robotic tools are easy
to implement and provide
peace of mind to the travel
agents…” He identified the
Traveller Notifier tool, which
sends impor tant notif ications to the traveller’s mobile phone, such as electronic
ticket issuance, flight delay,
boarding gate assignment
and boarding gate change.
The focus was to provide
the right solution for any
channel and, for the corporate market especially,
Amadeus is working on endto-end solutions “without
forgetting transversal activities that will be critical in the
future, like payments and big
data”.
Previously head of technical business at Travelstart,
an Amadeus customer, Mr.
Hedley said the experience
had helped in the new role.
Point of sale remains a
challenge for agents in this
market but he said Amadeus’
Remote Ticketing Solution,
which allows consolidators
to issue tickets for their network of non-ticketing agents
in other countries and even
with other currencies had
helped.
Surprisingly, Mr. Hedley
maintained that NDC could
benef it resellers and said
it needs to be considered
from every point of view.
“We understand the challenge travel agents face…
However, there is also a huge
opportunity for travel agents
to automate the more mundane tasks in the booking
process and dedicate more
time to getting to know their
customers, servicing their
needs and providing them
with unique travel experiences.
kulula
holidays
wished TIR
readers
a festive
season as
hot as its
deals and
as awesome as its
team…
“…T he t raveller tod ay
is in the driving seat and is
evolving much faster than
the travel agency. This comes
as a result of a lack of investment in the travel agent.
Travel agency owners need
to recognise the role of the
consultant as more than just a
booker, but as a partner in the
business.”
Mr. Hedley maintained
“yield and profitability of
tickets sold through travel
agents is greater than online/
direct. Indirect distribution
channels represent an estimated 50 percent of all global air bookings, including
LCCs.”
Amadeus estimates indirect distribution represents
a higher yield per passenger
of 34 percent (because many
indirect bookings represent
cor porate travel, complex
itinerar ies and long-haul
travel).
“For some time now, Amadeus has been boosting sales
of merchandising and ancillaries… The one that will
win it all will be able to offer, in an integrated way, all
the content that is coming
from different suppliers, with
the ability to personalise that
content… through different
distribution channels.”
Alitalia plans SA comeback
ALITALIA will fly between
Rome a nd Joha n nesbu rg
from April 8 next year, starting with four flights per week
and operated by a three-class
Airbus A330.
A tentative schedule was
published last month and the
airline said GDSs were being
updated.
Flights will leave Johannesburg on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, and
Rome on Tuesday, Thursday,
Saturday and Sunday.
m
Connecting South Africa
to more than 115 destinations
in Latin America.
The most extensive network in the region. Domestic flights in
Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay and Peru.
Increased services from 3 to 5 departing Johannesburg to
São Paulo direct every week, effective 17th November 17.*
*Subject to government approvals.
LATAM Airlines partner in Africa
+27 11 781 2140
salessupportza@servicinguk.zendesk.com
16
TIR Southern Africa

December 2017

LATAM





Powered by


Full screen Click to read
Paperturn flipbook system
Search
Overview
Download as PDF
Print
Shopping cart
Full screen
Exit full screen