Park Home Resident Magazine - Page 26



Get
Moving
If you are considering buying your first park home or moving from one to another, our handy
guides over the next few issues will provide you with tips, advice and websites to visit to make
sure you understand the legalities of buying and selling park homes. In this issue we look at
Buying Park Homes.
FACTS: Buying a Park Home
You are buying the home only. The ground that your home sits
on and the surrounding pitch (plot) remain the property of the
site owner.
You will need to comply to site rules.
You are protected with legal rights under the Mobile Homes Act
1983.
You will pay a monthly rent for the use of the pitch. This rent may
include some or all of your utility bills or they may be charged
separately as in a bricks and mortar home.
You will also still have to pay Council Tax.
The site owner is responsible for maintaining, managing and the
safe-running of the site.
You may have limitations to how you can extend, paint or add
features to the exterior of your home depending on the size of
your plot and site rules.
The site owner will typically take 10% commission from the person
you are buying the home from if it is an existing home.
When it comes to selling your home you will typically pay the site
owner 10% of the price you sell it for.
The resident selling the home to you does not need to provide
you with an EPC as they would in a bricks and mortar house.
Always use a solicitor who is knowledgeable in park home sales.
The procedure to follow is different depending on whether you
are buying from a resident or a site owner. It is also different
depending on when the existing owner occupied the home.
Surveys are optional but if you are investing your life-savings
into a park home it is worthwhile. Check that the surveyor has
proven experience of park homes.
26
There are many places to look to
find your dream park home.
You could buy a brand-new
home direct from a manufacturer
and search for a plot through
an estate agent, park home
manufacturer or online search
site to find a location to site
your new home on. Companies
like Quickmove and Tingdene
operate plot finder services.
Alternatively, you could look
for new homes being added
to existing sites. These can be
available as individual, one-off
homes when a plot is updated
or the site re-modelled.
Park Home sites also add in
whole new areas which are
typically a group of new park
homes with a similar look and
feel.
The most common purchase is
to buy a home from an existing
resident and these homes are
advertised through traditional
high street estate agents, online
estate agents and specialist
park home estate agents.
Which of these options you
choose is down to personal
choice, budget and location.





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