BL17 FINAL - Page 56



DRINK WELL
COCKTAILS WITH ALICE LASCELLES
PORT COBBLER
Boisdale Life’s resident drinks columnist
goes long with her Cobbler: a crushed
ice classic whose basic formula offers
plenty of delicious variation
PORT COBBLER
METHOD:
• 100ml ruby port
• 20ml Cointreau
• 5ml sugar syrup
• 1 dash Angostura
Bitters
• squeeze of orange/
clementine
• squeeze of lemon
• h andful of cubed
pineapple
• pineapple leaf /
citrus slices / straw
Put all ingredients in the
base of a shaker. Muddle
the pineapple gently,
then shake all ingredients
with ice. Strain into a
glass filled to the top
with crushed ice. Garnish
and serve.
The earliest Cobblers were made from
fortified wines such as sherry and port
– I’ve used port here, to give it a bit of an
autumnal feel. But as long as you stick
to that basic formula of wine, liqueur,
citrus and crushed ice you can make
a Cobbler out of just about anything:
champagne, red wine, Madeira. With
a bit of tweaking, you can make a
cobbler out of spirits, too. And you can
experiment with different liqueurs:
Cointreau plays nicely with port,
Maraschino liqueur goes well with fino
sherry and Grand Marnier is a good
match for Champagne. I love the tropical
kick that pineapple gives it, but it’s not
56
BOISDALELIFE .COM
AUTUMN 2019
ISSUE 17
GLASS:
Tall hurricane / large wine
glass / slender Collins
essential – a squeeze of lemon and
orange is all you need.
The Cobbler is a very forgiving drink.
And it’s a supremely delicious one, too.
Every time I have a Cobbler I wonder
why I ever bother drinking anything
else. The only laborious bit is crushing
the ice – if you haven’t got it on tap then
just wrap some ice cubes in a tea-towel
and bash them with a rolling pin.
All that ice makes a drinking straw
essential (an eco-friendly paper one,
rather than a plastic one, of course).
Some claim the Cobbler was the drink
the drinking straw was actually invented
for, so don’t leave it out.
JA MI E L AU
Y
ou wouldn’t know it, from the
sorry state of most people’s
freezers, but ice used to be
a great luxury. Prior to 1800,
only aristocrats and royals iced their
drinks. The man who changed all that
was Frederic Tudor, an enterprising
American who had the bright idea of
flogging ice from the pristine lakes of
New England, on an international scale.
By the late 19th century, America had
become a nation addicted to iced drinks
of all kinds. One of the most popular
was the Cobbler, a long drink made from
fortified wine, liqueur and citrus, served
over glistening ‘cobbles’ of ice.
INGREDIENTS





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