Colnaghi Collections_Vol 01 - Page 47



III
LUIS DE MORALES, CALLED “EL DIVINO”
Badajoz, ca. 1520 – 1586
Christ, the Man of Sorrows
Oil on panel
49.5 x 35 cm
PROVENANCE
Luis Morales was most likely trained in Seville under the tutelage
Private Collection, Spain
of Pedro de Campaña (Pieter von Kempeneer), a Flemish artist
who had previously spent time in Italy. Morales’s work similarly
LITERATURE
shows the influence of both Flemish and Italian art. Dubbed by
Unpublished
his eighteenth-century biographer, Antonio Palomino, “il Divino”
(an epithet inspired by the spiritual nature of his imagery), Morales
treated the subject of Christ, the Man of Sorrows perhaps more
frequently than any other.1 The artist’s skill in depicting intense
human drama, eliciting empathy and spiritual contemplation
from the viewer, was well suited to images of Christ’s Passion.
Compositionally as well as technically, this panel shows the
influence of Flemish and Italian models; iconographically it
recalls Netherlandish images of the “Man of Sorrows.” Christ’s
physical suffering is vividly suggested by the inclusion of a
cane and the Crown of Thorns drawing blood. Like many of
his contemporaries, Morales was also greatly influenced by
Cinquecento Italian art, possibly mediated through Sebastiano’s
Christ Carrying the Cross (see intro. fig. 2), which made its way to
Spain via the collection Don Jerónimo de Vich, who had been
a patron of the Italian artist when ambassador at Rome in the
early sixteenth century. Morales’s combination of Leonardesque
sfumato with a smooth and precise execution recalls Sebastiano’s
early Roman works, like the Christ executed for Vich.
46
47

Paperturn



Powered by


Full screen Click to read
Paperturn flip book viewer
Search
Overview
Download as PDF
Print
Shopping cart
Full screen
Exit full screen