Colnaghi Foundation Journal 03 - Page 83



80
The Bridgewater Collection and its picture frames
N OTES
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19.
See Peter Humfrey, “The 3rd Duke of Bridgewater as
a Collector of Old Master Paintings,” Journal of the
History of Collections 27 (2015): pp. 211-225.
Peter Humfrey, “The Stafford Gallery at Cleveland
House and the 2nd Marquess of Stafford as a
Collector,” Journal of the History of Collections 28 (2016):
pp. 43-55.
Ellesmere sale, Christie’s, 18 October 1946; Ellesmere
sales, Christie’s, 18 June 1976, nos.116-121; 2 July
1976, nos. 80-94.
Catalogue of the Bridgewater Collection of Pictures
(London, 1851). Unless otherwise stated, the former
Bridgewater paintings are now in the collection of the
Duke of Sutherland.
These payments were already noted by Susannah
Brooke, “Private Art Collections and London
Town Houses 1780-1830” (PhD diss., University of
Cambridge, 2013), p. 60.
For this work and a key to the paintings it represents,
see Ellinoor Bergvelt, “Patrons and Lovers of Art (182630): de ideale National Gallery van P. C. Wonder
en Sir John Murray,” in P. C. Wonder (1777-1852).
Een Utrechter in London, exh. cat. (Utrecht: Centraal
Museum, 2015), pp. 44-75.
For Lely’s painting and its sitter, see Humfrey, “The
3rd Duke of Bridgewater as a Collector,” pp. 213, 223
n. 12.
Probably acquired by the 1st Duke of Bridgewater
from the Portland sale in 1722, on the advice of Sir
Paul Methuen (not as in Humfrey, “The 3rd Duke of
Bridgewater as a Collector,” p. 213).
Humfrey, “The 3rd Duke of Bridgewater as a
Collector,” pp. 215, 224 n. 48; Amelia Smith, Longford
Castle. The Treasures and the Collectors (London: Unicorn,
2017), pp. 56-58.
For the Duke and the Trumbull sale, see Humfrey,
“The 3rd Duke of Bridgewater as a Collector,” pp.
215, 224 n. 45.
Julia Lloyd Williams, Dutch Art and Scotland. A Reflection
of Taste, exh. cat. (Edinburgh: National Gallery of
Scotland, 1992), p. 66.
”British picture framemakers, 1600-1950 – A”
accessed April 2018, https://www.npg.org.uk/
research/conservation/directory-of-britishframemakers/a#AU
See Brooke, “Private Art Collections.”
As suggested by Jacob Simon (see above, note 12).
Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, no. 880391.
See Francis Haskell, The Ephemeral Museum. Old
Master Paintings and the Rise of the Art Exhibition (New
Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2000) pp.
25, 169 n. 83.
Calonne sale, Skinner and Dyke, 28 March 1795,
no. 94.
Humfrey, “The Stafford Gallery at Cleveland House.”
An only slightly later diagram of the hang of the New
Gallery (in which, however, the frames are indicated
only schematically) is provided by William Young
Ottley, Engravings of the Most Noble The Marquis of
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
Stafford’s Collection of Pictures in London, 4 vols (London:
P.W. Tomkins, 1818), IV, Plate 3.
Nicholas Penny, National Gallery Catalogues. The Sixteenth
Century Italian Pantings. II: Venice 1540-1600 (London:
the National Gallery, 2008), pp. 462-464.
Very similar frames, likewise attributable to Aubé, still
surround paintings from the Bridgewater Collection
by Both (BG193) and Metsu (BG217) (both exGildemeester), and by Wouwermans (BG255) (of
uncertain provenance).
For example, paintings by Backhuijsen (BG122), De
Vois (BG137), Herp (BG181-2), Heyden (BG135),
Huijsum (BG131), Aert van der Neer (BG221),
Poelenburgh (BG162-3), Slingelandt (BG263), Tol
(BG150), Victoors (BG100), and Wijnants (BG190).
See Peter Humfrey, “The Sutherland Gallery at
Stafford House: Contents and Display,” Colnaghi Studies
Journal 1 (2017): pp. 124-149.
Catalogue of the Pictures belonging to Lord Francis Leveson
Gower at Bridgewater House (London, 1830).
For John Smith, see Charles Sebag-Montefiore with
Julia Armstrong-Totten, A Dynasty of Dealers. John Smith
and his Successors 1801-1924 (London: Roxburghe
Club, 2013); “British picture framemakers, 16001950 – A” accessed April 2018, https://www.npg.
org.uk/research/conservation/directory-of-britishframemakers/s/#SM
See Lucy Whitaker and Jonathan Marsden,
“Reframing the Royal Pictures. Episodes in the history
of Royal Taste,” Apollo 156 (2002): p. 53.
John Smith, Day Books with Indices of Buyers (5
vols., 1812-1867), Mss., the National Art Library,
Victoria and Albert Museum, London.
Bought by Lord Francis respectively ca. 1820 (Lloyd
Willams, Dutch Art and Scotland, p. 80) and at the Watson
Taylor sale, Christie’s, 13-14 June 1823, no. 42.
Smith, Day Books, II, fol. 200.
Smith, Day Books, II, fol. 479.
Smith, Day Books, II, fol. 479.
Smith, Day Books, III, fol. 12.
See respectively “British Picture Framemakers
1600- 1950” accessed April 2018, https://www.npg.
org.uk/research/ conservation/directory-of-britishframemakers/; Timothy Newbery, Frames and Framings
in the Ashmolean Museum (Oxford: Oxford University
Press, 2002); Whitaker and Marsden, “Reframing the
Royal Pictures.”
The Bridgewater Collection and its picture frames
81

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