Colnaghi Foundation Journal 03 - Page 92



90
Vittore Carpaccio (1460/1466? – 1525/1526), an innovative draughtsman
N OTES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Maddalena Spagnolo, “La matita rossa come luce e
colore: verifiche sulle studi di teste di Leonardo e dei
leonardeschi,” Polittico 1 (2000): pp. 65-82.
Jennifer Fletcher, “Carpaccio at the Courtauld
Institute,” British Art Journal 2 (2001): pp. 71-74.
Caroline Brooke, “Carpaccio’s Method of Composition
in his Drawings for the Scuola di S.Giorgio Teleri,”
Master Drawings 42 (2001): pp. 302-314.
Catherine Whistler, Venice and Drawing 1500-1800.
Theory, Practice and Collecting (New Haven and London:
Yale University Press, 2016), respectively pp. xvii-xviii
and pp. 206-208.
Hugo Chapman and Marzia Faietti, From Fra Angelico
to Leonardo: Italian Renaissance Drawings, exh. cat.
(London: British Museum, 2010), under no. 33.
London, Courtauld Institute, inv. D1978.PG422, pen
and brown ink partly over red chalk; see Carmen
Bambach, ed., Michelangelo Divine Draftsman and
Designer, exh. cat. (New York: The Metropolitan
Museum of Art, 2017), no. 38 and p. 108, and in
the same volume, a discussion of the fortification
drawings of 1527-1529 by Mauro Mussolin (nos. 104,
105, pp. 275-576).
London, British Museum, inv. 1933,0803.12, and
Chatsworth House, Devonshire Collection, inv. 738;
see Caroline Campbell and Alan Chong, Bellini
and the East, exh. cat. (Boston and London: Isabella
Stewart Gardner Museum and National Gallery,
2005), nos. 9 and 10, pp. 50-53. See Francis AmesLewis and Joanne Wright, Drawing in the Italian
Renaissance Workshop, exh. cat. (Nottingham and
London: University Art Gallery and Victoria &
Albert Museum, 1983), no. 57, for a discussion of the
Chatsworth drawing where it is observed that red
chalk underdrawing seems to have been a particular
Venetian technique.
See Sara Menato, Per la giovinezza di Carpaccio (Padua:
Padova University Press, 2016) on the importance
of Antonello da Messina, Giovanni Bellini, Ferrarese
painting, and other sources including Perugino, in
Carpaccio’s formation.
I am grateful to Sara Menato for this observation.
Royal Collection, inv. RCIN 91280; see George
Goldner, “Bellini’s Drawings,” in The Cambridge
Companion to Bellini, ed. Peter Humfrey (Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press, 2004), pp. 250-251.
See Rhoda Eitel-Porter in Cara Denison et al.,
The Thaw Collection. Master Drawings and Oil Sketches.
Acquisitions since 1994, exh. cat. (New York: Pierpont
Morgan Library, 2003), no. 1.
See Andrew Robison, La poesia della luce: disegni veneziani
dalla National Gallery of Art di Washington. The Poetry of
Light: Venetian Drawings from the National Gallery of Art,
Washington, exh. cat. (Venice: Museo Correr, 2014),
no. 9.
See Roger Rearick, Il disegno veneziano del Cinquecento
(Milan: Electa, 2001), pp. 9-21, for his consideration
of red chalk drawings attributed to Giorgione, with
references.
Vittore Carpaccio (1460/1466? – 1525/1526), an innovative draughtsman
91

Paperturn



Powered by


Full screen Click to read
Paperturn flipbook viewer
Search
Overview
Download as PDF
Print
Shopping cart
Full screen
Exit full screen