The Grand Tour in Venice - Page 45



THE GRAND TOUR IN VENICE
44
THE GRAND TOUR IN VENICE
45
THE MORGANS
One of the first of these transatlantic
migrants was J Pierpont Morgan (fig. 20), who
had completed his education in Switzerland
and made a nine-month tour of Europe with
his parents in 1853.
In 1859 his first wife Amelia (“Memie”)
Sturgis embarked on a grand tour with her
father. Before she set out, her fiancé, Pierpont,
wrote gravely to her father giving advice on
the best routes to Venice:
Having been over most of th e ground myself several tim es,
I am convinced that you will find th e order in which I
have arranged your visit to th e various cities best conducive
to th e pleasure of th e present trip and to th e satisfaction of
future retrospection. You take th e railway for Marseilles...
From Marseilles you proceed to Genoa by way of th e
“cornich e route,” without any exception th e finest ride in
th e world — have an open carriage if possible. By rail to
Turin, very little of interest. From th ence to Milan...
Fig. 20 J Pierpont
Morgan in
overcoat, New
York, The Morgan
Library & Museum.
I think th e rail from Turin to Milan is now completed.
Milan is very interesting; from th ence by rail to Venice.
Following her tour of the continent, Amelia
Sturgess returned to England. She was
escorted back across the Atlantic by the lovestruck JP Morgan, whom she married in 1861,
but their happiness was to be cut short by her
early death from tuberculosis four months
later. Following Amelia’s death, JP Morgan
continued to visit Venice as part of his annual
summer cruises in Europe, latterly on his
famous steam yacht The Corsair. He was a
major contributor to the rebuilding of the
campanile which collapsed in 1902 (fig. 21).
Fig. 21 Morgan's
yacht, The Corsair,
in Venice, 1902.

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