The Grand Tour in Venice - Page 93



THE GRAND TOUR IN VENICE
92
THE GRAND TOUR IN VENICE
93
CHURCHES & SCUOLE
This section highlights a small selection of
the most important Venetian churches,
which are grouped chronologically into
two main categories: Medieval and
Renaissance Churches and Palladian and
Baroque churches. Adjacent to many of the
churches are the buildings of the scuole, or
confraternities, which contain some of the
glories of Venetian Renaissance art.
Fig. 57 Giambattista
Tiepolo, The Banquet
of Cleopatra, 1746-1747,
fresco, 650 x 300cm,
Venice, Palazzo Labia.
Is th ere any h ouse with modern impro vem ents
in Am erica, wh ich has also windows, with pointed
arch es of marble, opening upon balconies that
o verhang th e Grand Canal? Th e apartm ent had
six rooms, furnish ed with every article necessary
for Venetian h ousekeeping. We paid one dollar
a day wh ich, in th e innocence of our h earts we
th ough t rath er dear.
The churches of Venice, which have so
much to offer the visitor, were always on
the itineraries of eighteenth-century grand
tourists and their American successors,
though sometimes, as Henry James
complained, their greatest masterpieces were
darkened by time and hidden way in dimlylit chapels:
Th e church es of Venice are rich in pictures, and
many a masterpiece lurks in th e u naccommodating
gloom of side-chapels and sacristies. Many a
noble work is perch ed beh ind th e dusty candles
and muslin roses of a scantily-visited altar…
It may be said as a general th ing that you never
see Tintoret. You admire h im, you adore h im, you
th ink h im th e greatest of painters, but in th e
great majority of cases your eyes fail to deal with
h im. Th is is partly h is own fault; so many of h is
works ha ve turned to blackness and are positively
rotting in th eir fram es. 

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