FL02 PDF (212pp) - Page 90



Fishing In The Edge
tion over the next half hour, I made an
interesting observation. Neither of the
two big fish ate a single grain of corn
without seriously playing around with
it first, using its pecs and lips,
whereas the hemp was eaten with no
hesitation – every grain went down
the hatch. Once it had all disappeared, which took about 20 minutes,
the two big fish buggered off
instantly. The remaining fish ate the
last of the corn, except the artificial
piece with my hook attached, and
went on their merry way. This is what
I was convinced the fish were doing
to me out in the middle, but I couldn’t
see what was going on.
So, in 30-40 minutes observing my
margin spot I thought I’d cracked it –
all I had to do was lose the corn as a
hookbait, and work out a way of using
hemp successfully on the hair. With a
bit of thought this was easily
achieved (see photo). I lowered the rig
on to the hotspot to await their return.
At 4.35am the rod screamed off and I
was playing an angry carp, but minutes later the fish was beaten and
was in the arms of the net. Whether I
landed it or not I remember thinking
how pleased I was that the hemp rig
worked, and instantly too. I was lucky
enough to have the only (debatable)
fully scaled carp in the lake, and the
pleasure was all mine at a little over
25lbs. I now had an overwhelming
confidence, and couldn’t wait to
return after my 48-hrs away. The next
two days felt like two weeks, as I was
gagging to get back to the pool. I
could think of nothing else but the
pool at the time, and just how I could
catch more now the sweetcorn had
gone from the hook.
This presented a
perfect
opportunity
lower my hemp
rig on the spot,
and hide my
leadcore in the
surrounding
weed
Soon enough I was screaming back
up the M25 for another 48-hr session.
Once in position, I carefully lowered
the rig down, put the kettle on, and
sat back for a smoke. After an hour or
so I decided to creep to the edge and
see if anything was happening. To my
shock the big common was on the
spot hoovering up the hemp, and
within seconds of this the fish started
shaking its head violently, just after I
saw the hook fly in to its mouth. Suddenly the spool was spinning, and I
was into one of the big commons. I
don’t know how I didn’t shake the
hook out of it, as my arms turned to
jelly knowing what I had on the end.
After a respectable scrap my first 30lb
The Spot close to the reeds in right hand corner.
90 FREE LINE
common was in the net, and at 30lb
12oz, I was ecstatic. The day after I
pretty much had an exact replica of
the day before, except this time I had
a fish called the Number 1 fish. To this
day it is the most handsome fish I
have ever caught. It always reminds
me of a mini-Mallin’s, a true spectacle
I’m sure you will agree. The weight of
the fish however I will have to let you
decide. As the fish neared the net I
noticed a small amount of eggs coming from arse end of it. I didn’t think
any more of it until it came to weighing her. She went 30lb 6oz, but at that
moment she decided to leave me with
a huge pile of eggs. Not knowing
quite what to do with this collection
of tapioca in my sling, I quickly photographed the fish, thanked her very
much, and released into the depths.
There was 21lb 8oz of eggs in the
sling so like I said; I’ll let you decide.
Either way I wasn’t fussed, I was the
happiest man alive, absolutely blown
away with what had happened in the
last 48 hours. Needless to say I slept
well that night. To think none of this
would have ever happened had I not
got my lazy arse out of bed that morning to observe that the bigger fish
were avoiding the corn. In years gone
by I probably would have put the lack
of action down the fish not feeding, or
the weather not being right when
really most of the time it was me fishing like a nob. I would like to point out
at this stage that the date of the capture was the 30th June, so had the
start of the season been the 16th it
wouldn’t have made any difference.
Unfortunately due to a pretty hectic
work schedule, I didn’t manage to get
back to the pool for a couple of
months, which meant I missed out on
some of the best months of fishing,
especially in the edge. However the
knowledge I had gained meant that
when I did return, I was brimming
with confidence, and figured all I had
to do now was to find my intended
quarry, and everything else would
work as it had done before. It wasn’t
until early October that I returned,
and it soon became apparent that the
carp weren’t patrolling the same
areas as they were in the summer. No
point wasting any time then, and anyone that has fished the pool will know
that the snags to the right of the ruin
is almost a guaranteed spot to try to
find some of its inhabitants. Sure
enough there was a group of fish to

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