FL02 PDF (212pp) - Page 91



Fishing In The Edge
be found. There were seven fish in
view, moving in and out of the snag,
including Bazil, Lumpy, Little Lumpy
and both the twin commons. The
smallest of the bunch must have been
at least 30lbs – exciting stuff. I
watched the fish for the next 2-3
hours, but there seemed to be little
action. Eventually one of the fish
started patrolling around the point to
the left of the snag. The area is mainly
clean gravel, and about 4ft in depth.
The fish easily recognised as Little
Lumpy was moving slowly enough
around the area to think about
angling for it. So the simplest of plans
was constructed – one handful of
hemp on a spot where I knew the fish
was going to return to (hoped). As it
goes the fish did re-appear, within
minutes, and started troughing
straight away. Ten minutes went by,
the spot was gleaming, and once the
last grain of hemp had disappeared
The Common at 33lb 10oz.
Little Lumpy went back to the snags
to digest. This presented a perfect
opportunity to lower my hemp rig on
the spot, and hide my leadcore in the
surrounding weed. Only a handful of
hemp was introduced in the swim,
just in case she wasn’t as hungry on
her return, if she returned at all.
Half an hour had passed and
curiosity got the better of me, so I
went back in to the snags to see what
was going on. As I arrived Little
Lumpy was on her way out, and I had
a fair idea as to where she was heading. It was a job to get there before
she did. Instantly my heart was racing
as she dropped down on the spot.
Within seconds she was shaking her
head and her pecs were going wild,
but she never moved off the spot, and
I only received one bleep, but I
latched into it anyway. Fighting wasn’t the old girl’s strong point, and after
a few twists and turns she was in the
awaiting net. At 31lb 10oz, I was more
than happy with my day’s work,
which was actually very simple fishing. A little observation goes a long
way in this marginal fishing business,
as does anywhere else in the lake.
My confidence was so high after
my short campaign on the pool that I
decided to try my luck on another
small, very low stocked lake in Surrey.
The lake didn’t have anywhere near
the clarity of the pool, but the same
approach was used. Due to the
amount of tench and bream in the
lake, the hemp was replaced with
boilies. I decided on a spot under a
tree stump by a lily set in 7ft of water.
The end tackle had to be upped at
this stage, as I knew full well where
the fish were going should you hook
one. The lily bed must be 25x25m, and
offered little opportunity to retrieve
tethered fish. Again only one rod was
used to avoid spooking fish that may
have been moving in and out of the
area. I was rewarded that afternoon
with the largest of the inhabitants,
but it had recently spawned, and so
only went 34lb 14oz – not that I was
complaining. After a fresh rig was tied
on, I lowered it back on the spot, and
introduced another fifty 15mm baits
over the top.
The following morning the rod rattled again, but was heading for the lily
bed at full speed. After a hectic scrap
the plump mirror was secured in the
mesh. At 32lb 11oz I couldn’t believe
my luck. I managed to keep what I
was doing on the sly, and returned a
week later without anyone being the
wiser. I was soon back on my spot,
and to say I was confident would
have been an understatement. Later
that afternoon I wasn’t to be disappointed, having landed a fantastic
looking common that apparently
rarely hits the bank. She went 33lb
10oz, and looked mighty fine on my
mat. The following day I had a repeat
capture of the plump mirror of a similar weight. It has been a fascinating
year for me and a huge eye-opener
into the world of margin fishing, as I
hope it has been for some of you. In
my next piece I shall take you through
a detailed description of the end
tackle and methods used. The following year I ended up on the infamous
Yateley Car Park where the edge fishing got really interesting. Until then,
make your excuses, and get on the
bank. n
FREE LINE 91

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