FL10 (All 218 pages) - Page 171



The Hunt for Hendrix
H
i all. It’s early
August as I sit in
my study writing
this, and as I look
out of the window I
can’t get over how
the nights are drawing in once again
(it’s only just after 9pm and it’s virtually dark!) Still, the best time of year
for fishing is almost upon us, and I
hope the autumn is better for me than
the summer has been. I had a great
winter/spring what with me having
the Northern from the Manor, and I
have managed a few others, which I’ll
tell you about in a bit, but the last few
weeks have been a bit slow for me to
say the least.
I’ll start with the sad news of late.
These last few weeks have seen a fair
few of our English heritage big carp
across the country pass away. Toll
Pits lost two great old history fish in
the shapes of the mighty Plodder and
the Italian. The Essex Manor then lost
The Amphibian. A place close to my
heart, an estate lake in Essex called
Little Easton Manor, recently had an
algae bloom that in turn caused an
oxygen deficiency, which resulted in
the sad loss of a stunning old mirror
called Drop Scale, a fish I was fortunate enough to catch at a weight of
41lb 8oz. I understand that the EA
acted quickly and installed aerating
pumps, which as far as I am aware
prevented any other deaths within
the lake. The quarry in Essex lost its
big common Jagger, and then it was
reported that Braxted Back Lake has
lost its biggest resident common
called Lindens, or Split Scale as it was
also known, although there seems to
be some confusion as to whether it
was that fish. I remember seeing
Dave Levy on the front cover of a
magazine with it a couple of years
back, and couldn’t get over how stunning it looked. It’s a real shame that
these true English carp have passed
on, and I’m sure that there are a lot of
people out there who are gutted by
their deaths, whether it be anglers
that were targeting them, or anglers
that have great memories of when
they caught them. I’m sure these fish
will all be missed by a huge amount of
us.
(Above) A view out from the Bowls
swim.
(Below) 17lb old-looking linear – the
first of the four.
FREE LINE 171

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