FL11 All pages - Page 84



In Search of Monster Carp
Mark before we started doing the
tape and said to him, “Look Mark, can
you tell us all that you know about
it?” He confessed to me that he doesn’t know too much, and he doesn’t
want to either, but it’s a disease that
affects the nervous system. Mark is
going to talk about it a little bit and
tell us what the chances are basically,
and about are the cures that are out
there. Along with that, we’re going to
catch up with Mark’s season down on
the Road Lake. He’s had a really good
year this year; he’s really into his fishing, and he hasn’t let this terrible
thing affect him too badly. Obviously
it’s going to affect you and the rest of
the family, but he’s a credit to us all;
he’s got his head down and said,
“Look, this is not going to stop me
going fishing; in fact I want to get out
there and do more fishing than ever.”
His wife has been really understanding as well, and let him go and do his
thing. So, in passing the microphone
over to Kodak, I am sure all around the
c o u n t r y t h e r e ’s a b i g r o u n d o f
applause going on.
Mark: I’d like to say thank you to
Rob for letting me be in the mag;
we’ve been friends, like he said, for
many years. I don’t know how to start
really, but I’ve just got to dive straight
Probably about 40 years old this one,
24Lb 12oz.
84 FREE LINE
in. Like Rob said, I’ve got Parkinson’s.
This isn’t a cry for sympathy, it’s just
really trying… If other people have
got anything like this, you can’t give
up; you’ve just to keep going. You’ve
got to push yourself to the limit until
you can’t do any more. It’s taken
about three years for me to get diagnosed with it, but it was actually
Parkinson’s. I kept getting told by the
hospital that there was nothing
wrong with me. The other year I got
rushed in, and they thought I had
either had a mild stroke or some form
of heart attack, but all the tests come
back negative, so obviously it wasn’t
that. My other half asked for them to
do tests on me for Parkinson’s and
MS, which is what they did. I ended
up seeing seven consultants over this
period of time before getting diagnosed, and I ended up actually going
back to the first guy, who diagnosed
me. The day that he diagnosed me
was a day that I’ll never forget, which
is probably an obvious statement to
make, but you know. He asked me to
get undressed, sat down and hit my
knee, tested my reflexes, tested my
arms, sticking pins in me, and I was
laughing to be honest with you. I just
thought I had a trapped nerve, and I
was overreacting to it all. I knew
something wasn’t right when he
started looking in my eyes; he was
looking for a long time, and then told
me to get dressed straight away. I sat
down and he just said basically,
“There’s no easy way to tell you other
than this; you’ve got Parkinson’s.”
Jane, my other half, hit the desk and I
heard a bang. I looked round, held my
chin and looked at the wall, and I said
a choice word which I won’t repeat. I
looked at the doctor and said to him,
“How long have I got?” His reply was,
“You’re not going to live to be an old
man.”
My initial reaction then in my own
head was, “Right, I’ve got to try and
beat this.” We got home from the hospital; Jane was in bits, and we were
both crying and upset about things.
Then I made her a promise: I said, “I’m
going to be the first person ever to
beat this; I won’t let it beat me.” She’s
been a tower of strength for me, if I
get headache, I’m rolling around in
bits; I’m a big wuss, but you could
sever her arm and she wouldn’t even
notice – she’s a strong girl.
It buggers your life up, but I don’t
want sympathy; I just want other
people to carry on. If you’ve got it or
anything like this, don’t let anything
beat you – just carry on doing what
you’ve got to do. If you get strong in
your head, you can hold things at bay.
I know I’m not going to beat this at
the moment; it’s going to get hold of
me, and it’s like carrying a time bomb
in my body - you’re just waiting for it
to go off. I suppose in some ways,
each week there are slight changes. I

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