FL12Sept - Page 170



All Things Riggy
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needing a heavy lead to achieve the
short distance, I still tend to opt for a
heavyish lead (3.5oz-plus) as this
helps with hooking the carp, and also
if fishing in weed a heavy lead is
quicker in discharging in the fight
either on a lead clip, or on the leadcore with the ‘outside of the inline
lead’ technique. Circumstances for
me using a smaller lead would be setting up on top of fish. The last thing
you want to do after finally finding the
fish all tucked up in a quiet bay is to
168 FREE LINE
Leads come in all shapes and sizes.
I carry a lead for every situation.
Large surface area on flat leads.
Also a lower profile on flats.
Distance or tournament leads for range work.
Right weight lead for your rod.
send them bow waving off by chucking quarter of a pound of lead at them.
At these times a stealthier method is
required, and it’s a case of waiting ‘til
they drift away from your desired
spot, and with a gentle cast with a
small 1/1 1/2oz lead lightly ‘plop’ it in
avoiding a big splash that would blow
your cover.
Also a lighter lead is much easier to
control I find when having to perform
sideways casts, especially to overhanging trees/snags etc. An ungainly
heavy lead travels too fast and ends
up in the tree instead of off the edge
of it! Because you have to push a
heavy lead for it to travel you lose
control, where say a 2oz lead only
needs to be flicked, so much greater
control is exerted, giving you a fraction more time to judge the cast and
feather it down at the critical
moment.
A method that dictates the weight
of the lead is the chodernoster. When
fishing this method I use only the

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