FL12Sept - Page 172



All Things Riggy
amount of lead necessary to achieve
the distance. Firstly I don’t want
excessive weight if casting over bottom weed/soft silt, which is normally
the case when I use the choddy. A
light lead will not plummet deep into
the weed or silt, and thus the leadcore
can settle lightly down and so the rig
is visible and presented on top. Secondly if heavy weed is about and I
choose to use a rotten bottom of say
3-4lb mono link; too heavy a lead will
only result in cracking off and the link
dropping in the edge. The third reason
being I use this method when casting
to showing fish, so I have a presentable rig when casting to unknown
lakebeds without the use of a marker
float, so as I said, it’s a much better
option to use a small lead of a square
pear/bottle shape to avoid too much
splash.
With such a huge array of leads on
the market how do you go about
choosing what shape and colour and
even texture to go for? As with all
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aspects of my fishing I try to use what
I consider at the time to be the right
tool for the job, and as I spend a bit of
time learning what my intended spot
is like with the use of the marker rod,
I then decide on a lead that fits the bill
for that given situation. If I go through
a couple of examples on what my
thinking would be to arrive at my lead
choice hopefully that might give you
an insight as to how I arrive at the
choice of lead.
The lake I’m fishing on as I write
5
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A flat makes a good silt lead
The chodernoster.
Small leads have their place too..
A running lead setup can give better indication on your
bobbins.
5 Two methods for losing the lead.
170 FREE LINE

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