freeline-24 - Page 147



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Hawke & Newcon Range Finders.
others have said, there is no one rig
that is dedicated to tiger nuts, therefore whatever rig you normally use
should be fine.
I can’t really comment too much on
mealworms, as apart from feeding my
lizards with them when I was a
youngster, I never ever really considered using them as bait, and would
think that it would be quite a costly
exercise if you did. I’ve absolutely no
reason to think that a carp wouldn’t
eat them, although I might be wrong,
but I can’t imagine them being some
sort of ‘wonder’ bait. I don’t know
about the rest of you, but I’ve often
had new bait ideas over the years and
most of the time they have been a
complete waste of time. I think Laney
might remember one of them – baby
sweetcorns. Everyone knows how
much fish like sweetcorn, therefore I
thought these must be a winner,
especially so as they are crunchier
than sweetcorn plus a lot more
resilient to casting and easier to fish
on a hair - wrong! I tried them on the
very productive (at the time) Parc
Farm One fishery and couldn’t get a
bite despite everyone around me
catching. Needless to say I never tried
them again.
Another bait that obviously does
catch carp but I personally have
found to be useless is lobworms. It
might just be me, but in the past I’ve
been stalking carp and had the worm
crawling all over its face, the carp
seemingly oblivious to it and not even
acknowledging it as food. As Rob
said, mealworms are quite fragile
once in water and with a hook in
them, I can’t therefore see them being
a worthwhile proposition at all.
Losing three out of four on a weedy
lake is not good, but having said that
a couple of sessions ago I lost two out
of three; one due to a fairly quick hook
pull before the fish even hit the weed
and one where the line broke as soon
as I tightened into it, probably caused
by a mussel or something clamping
onto my line. I know Sean and Ed
have slagged it off a bit, but I would
much prefer to be using braided main
line in weedy situations and am convinced you’ve got a lot more chance
of landing a fish due to the lack of
stretch. Trouble is, on the lake I’m
fishing it’s not allowed, which is fair
enough suppose, as fishery managers
have to take into consideration inexperienced anglers that don’t quite
know what they’re doing. It’s a difficult one really, because irrespective of
what the rules are, there is always
going to be somebody fishing that
could be putting fish at risk due to
their tackle.
As you all probably know I run a
fishery myself, and up until recently I
have always imposed common sense
rules such as the compulsory use of
unhooking mats, no sacking in warm
or drought conditions etc and things
like that. Just recently though I’ve
had to have a bit of a rethink as I’ve
lost one of the big old fish due to it
possibly being tethered, and only last
week, two carp were caught that
were trailing tackle, both of which still
had the leads attached with absolutely no chance of them coming off.
Well I’ve made a decision not to
impose any bans or additional rules,
instead I’ve asked my bailiffs to do a
rig check on everyone fishing there,
and then if anyone is found to be
using something that is a bit suspect,
not to give them a bollocking, but
instead to educate them how to set
things up correctly.
As both Sean and Ed quite correctly said, using braid straight
through could lead to the fish’s flanks
being damaged during the fight,
therefore it is vitally important that
the last three or four feet above the
lead is protected by tubing or a thick
nylon leader, obviously making sure
that the lead and everything else is
free to come off.
Something else that sprang to mind
recently was damage that could be
being caused by the coating on some
types of lead. I recently caught a fish
that had quite a fresh graze on its
head that didn’t look like it had been
caused by spawning activity; instead
it looked like it had been caused by
something rough rubbing up against
Weedy – will you land ‘em?
FREE LINE 147

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