5th MARCH 2020 - Page 34



34
FARMFAMILY
FARMWEEK
JANUARY 23 2020
FARMWEEKENDER
Your TV and radio highlights
As a nation have we really gone soft on crime?
CATCH-UP: Being Gail
Porter, BBC iPlayer
PICK OF THE WEEK: Crime: Are We Tough Enough? 9.15am, Monday-Friday, BBC One
IN 1999, Gail Porter was one
of the UK’s most sought-after
female TV presenters. Most
famously, she helped sell
over a million copies of FHM
magazine after her naked
image was projected onto the
Houses of Parliament.
Then over the next 20 years, things
took a turn for the worse: she suffered
post-natal depression, alopecia and was
sectioned under the mental health act.
In 2014 she even ended up sleeping
rough on a park bench. How did this
happen?
In this documentary, Gail takes a
tell-all journey into her past. Travelling
to her hometown of Edinburgh, she
meets friends, relatives and medical
professionals and asks why she has
such extremes of emotion? And how
can that explain her story? The result
is an honest and deeply personal
exploration of mental health, self-harm,
anorexia and depression, and a stark
reminder of how the world has changed
since her 1990s heyday.
C
HRIS Daw QC, one of the
country’s most eminent
criminal barristers,
and Ayesha Nayyar, the Law
Society’s Solicitor of the Year,
look at how Britain’s courts are
handling what many believe is
a law and order crisis.
Ayesha thinks the system
should be prosecuting more,
getting higher conviction rates
and sending those found guilty
to prison for longer.
Chris, on the other hand,
thinks we’re already doing all
that – and it’s not working. He
thinks we need to be sending
fewer people to jail and for
less time. Instead, he believes,
the legal system needs to look
at solutions that can keep
people out of the courts in the
rst place – namely regulating
drugs.
Ayesha visits Lowestoft to
meet Adele Bellis, who was
attacked by a man at a bus
stop with acid. However, after
suffering months recovering in
hospital, it was her experience
of going through the courts
that left her with psychological
scars as bad as those on her
face. Not only was she called a
liar in court, but her attacker
got out after two years and is
now free to move back to the
area. She doesn’t think she got
anywhere near justice.
Chris visits Manchester
Crown Court where he
explains why both sides
– including those accused
of crime – need to be fairly
represented in court. There
he meets a former Chief
Prosecutor for the North of
England, who agrees with
Chris that long sentences do
not lead to less crime.
ABOVE: Law Society’s Solicitor of the Year, Ayesha Nayyar advocates that we
should be prosecuting more and sending those found guilty to prison for longer.
WEEKEND CHOICE: FA Cup football, BBC One, Saturday and Sunday
I
ABOVE: Gary Lineker introduces the most-anticipated tie of the round as league
leaders Liverpool travel to lower-league opposition.
CROSSWORD
CLUES
ACROSS
DOWN
1) Where bat’s men may be
having a rest (7-5)
7) How ageing laird used
white of egg as varnish (5)
8) Demand broken rod with
some hesitation (5)
9) From widow came artificial
language (3)
10) Keepers of the risers, in
torrential rainfall (5-4)
11) Rye lad had was web-like
(6)
12) Put rent up for better (6)
15) In the main he could
save a body (9)
17) Speak partly about a
pulse (3)
18) Fabric found in New York
and London (5)
19) Ranted and drivelled (5)
21) From the “slut” no action
taken on deliberation (12)
1) Inherit property after a flight
(4-2-2-4)
2) The attack East was caused by
sheep killing parrot (3)
3) Got the gist of a piece of cord
(6)
4) To se, do about turn and
peruse (4-5)
5) Riding skills at cattle round
up (5)
6) With verse trap ion in keeping
alive traditional things (12)
7) Grow lovingly into a grumble
(5)
10) Sheep neck found by 100
hundred in grass dens (5-4)
13) Part of the instep I
determined was lukewarm (5)
14) From Los Angeles broken lure
found in bay leaf (6)
16) Sounds like youngster I owe
for sheets of paper (5)
20) Way to go in aviation (3)
TS FA Cup weekend and the
BBC has three live matches,
beginning with Championship
promotion hopefuls Brentford
facing Leicester City from
12.15pm on Saturday in what
promises to be a compelling tie
between two vibrant sides who
are surpassing expectation this
season.
Brentford reached the FA Cup
fth round for the rst time
in 13 years last season, and
this could be an emotionally
charged tie at Grifn Park,
which they are leaving in the
summer after 116 years.
Then on Sunday at 12.45pm
reigning champions Manchester
City host Fulham, who knocked
out top-ight opponents in the
previous round and are also
vying for an immediate return
to the Premier League.
While City have reached this
stage of the competition for the
eighth successive season, Scott
Parker’s Fulham side ended a
three-year wait for an FA Cup
win by beating Aston Villa
earlier this month.
The Whites have lost their
past eight matches against
Manchester City though.
At 4.30pm Gary Lineker
introduces the most-anticipated
tie of the round, with Liverpool
travelling to lower-league
opposition as they seek to
reach the last 16 for the rst
time under Jurgen Klopp.
Despite Liverpool’s stunning
renaissance under the German,
victory over Everton in the
third round was only their
fourth in 11 FA Cup matches
under him – with Exeter City
and Plymouth Argyle taking
the Reds to replays during that
time.
ON THE RADIO: The
Science of Evil, 8pm,
BBC Radio 4, Saturday
THE Holocaust Memorial
Day on January 27 marks
the 75th anniversary
of the liberation of
Auschwitz. Attempts to
understand racism, antisemitism and
the horrors of Nazi ideology led to
the creation of a new field of science:
social psychology. The investigation
of how our thoughts, feelings and
behaviours are influenced by others.
This Archive on 4 is about the science
of evil and five of its pioneers: Kurt
Lewin, Solomon Asch, Henri Tajfel,
Serge Moscovici and Stanley Milgram.
They were all Jewish. They all lost
family in the Holocaust. They were all
driven by one question: how could it
have happened? At 5.30pm on BBC
Radio 3, Sunday, Words And Music
commemorates the liberation of
Auschwitz with Henry Goodman and
Maria Friedman reading poetry and
prose about life and death at the most
notorious Nazi concentration camp.
Answers to last week’s
edition
ACROSS
DOWN
1) see18
across.
9) Awn.
10) Stopwatch.
11) Discs.
13) Israeli.
14) Rarest.
16) Osiric.
18 and 1
across)
New year
resolutions.
19) Say so.
20) Deep
toned.
21) Ode.
22) Estate
agent.
2) Ean.
3) Oasts.
4) Utopia.
5) Inwards.
6) Not near by.
7) Hand
grenade.
8) Chain
stores.
12) Straw
beds.
15) Spectra.
17) Grange.
19) Sprig.
21) Own.

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