EMIS ReportDesign-Prelim 2020sep11 - Page 21



This section reports on the results of data collection
around motivation for EMIS, measures implemented
using the EMIS, and energy savings.
Benefits Motivating EMIS Implementation
Energy and cost savings are almost always a driving
factor in the decision to implement an EMIS, as shown
in Figure 7.
The wide range of benefits indicated by
organizations provided motivations to install an EMIS
and value from multiple perspectives: owners, energy/
facility managers, and
While energy cost
building operators.
savings was a common
While energy cost
driver, 79 percent
savings was a common
of organizations
driver, it is noteworthy
considered the EMIS a
that 79 percent of
benefit for informing
organizations considered
retrofits or validating
the EMIS a benefit
for informing retrofits
project savings
or validating project
savings. Occupant comfort and improved operations
were additional benefits considered important by more
than half of participating organizations.
Further, non-energy benefits played a key role in
garnering O&M staff support for EMIS use. Analytics
can identify issues before they grow into occupant
complaints or equipment failures. For example,
operators generally do not have time to perform
preventative maintenance on all terminal units;
operations are typically assessed when there are
comfort complaints. Using FDD, building operators
can evaluate terminal unit performance proactively at
a broad scale in a fraction of the time it would take
to check all the boxes. Cycling equipment is another
common operational issue identified through EMIS;
eliminating cycling improves equipment life.
Top Measures Implemented
Organizations participating in the Campaign were
asked to indicate up to 10 of the most frequently
implemented measures that they identified using
their EMIS from a list of 26 common operational
improvement opportunities. Figure 8 (next page) shows
the frequency in which measures were selected.
The measures in Figure 8 are consistent with typical
measures implemented during EBCx. The higher
education and office sectors focused more than the
other market sectors on occupant behavior through
sharing energy information with staff and students.
FDD supported identification of simultaneous heating
and cooling, economizer operation, reset schedules,
and control loop hunting, among other measures.
Both EIS and FDD supported identification of improved
schedules and setpoints. The ways in which EIS and
FDD support the identification of these measures are
summarized in Table 2 and Table 3 (page 21).
3. SMART ENERGY ANALYTICS CAMPAIGN RESULTS
3.2 EMIS Benefits
FIGURE 7: Benefits of implementing EMIS
(Percent of time benefit was chosen by participating organizations, may select multiple benefits)
91%
Energy savings
Utility cost savings
82%
Data to inform retrofit strategies or validate energy savings
79%
Improved occupant comfort
58%
O&M staff labor savings due to improved operations
51%
Peak demand reduction
42%
Other
8%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
Benefits Selected by Participants
Berkeley Lab | Proving the Business Case for Building Analytics
19





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