2020 LDWF Recreational Fishing Regulations - Page 59



FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORIES
FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY
Fish consumption advisories in Louisiana are based on chemical levels in the fish filet.
Advisories are issued at very conservative levels to insure the safety of individuals consuming fish. Advisories provide guidance regarding fish consumption for each species of fish.
They do not tell you to stop fishing or to stop eating fish. Just be selective about the fish
you or your family eats. None of the fish in Louisiana are contaminated enough to cause
harm after a single or a few meals. The health risk comes from eating contaminated fish
often and regularly over a long period of time.
HEALTH ADVICE AND GUIDELINES
Contaminants found in Louisiana fish can be grouped into two categories: organic chemicals (HCB, HCBD, PCBs and Dioxin) and metals (mercury, lead). Organic contaminants build
up in fish fat deposits and just under the skin, more than in the muscle tissue (filet). Metals
are distributed evenly throughout the fish and cannot be removed from the filet by cooking or cleaning.
HOW TO REDUCE ORGANIC CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION IN FISH




Remove all organs and skin. Organs
and skin can be high in fat and organic
chemicals.
Trim off fatty areas. This includes belly
fat, side fat and back fat. Organic contaminants concentrate in fat.
Bake or broil skinned, trimmed fish on
a rack or grill so fat drips off. Throw
away drippings.
When fish are poached or fried, throw
away the broth or oil. Keep smaller



fish to eat. Usually, younger, smaller
fish are less contaminated than larger,
older fish.
Eat fewer predator fish such as bass,
gar or pickerel. Contaminants bioaccumulate in predator fish.
Vary diet by eating a variety of fish,
shellfish, meat and poultry.
Vary source of fish, seafood, meat,
poultry and wild game.
CONSUMPTION ADVICE FOR WOMEN WHO ARE PREGNANT,
NURSING OR MIGHT BECOME PREGNANT AND FOR YOUNG
CHILDREN (EPA AND FDA, 2004)
By following these three recommendations
for selecting and eating fish or shellfish,
women and young children will receive the
benefits of eating fish and shellfish and be
confident that they have reduced their
exposure to the harmful effects of mercury.
Follow these same recommendations when
feeding fish or shellfish to a young child,
but serve smaller portions.
1. Do not eat shark, swordfish, king
mackerel or tilefish, as these contain
high levels of mercury.
2. Eat up to 12 ounces a week of a variety of fish and shellfish that are lower
3.
in mercury. The five most commonly
eaten fish that are low in mercury are
shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon,
pollock and catfish. Up to six ounces a
week of albacore (“white”) tuna may
be consumed since this variety contains more mercury than light tuna.
Check local advisories about the safety of fish caught by family and friends
in your local lakes, rivers and coastal
areas. If no advice is available, eat up
to six ounces per week of fish caught
in local waters. Do not consume any
other fish that same week.
www.wlf.louisiana.gov
63

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