ImmerseBeginnings NLT - Page 183



13:27-46
L e v itic u s
171
than s­ kin-­deep and has faded, the priest must quarantine the infected
person for seven days. On the seventh day the priest must examine the
person again. If the affected area has spread on the skin, the priest must
pronounce that person ceremonially unclean, for it is clearly a serious skin
disease. But if the affected area has not changed or spread on the skin and
has faded, it is simply a swelling from the burn. The priest will then pronounce the person ceremonially clean, for it is only the scar from the burn.
“If anyone, either a man or woman, has a sore on the head or chin,
the priest must examine it. If he finds it is more than ­skin-­deep and has
fine yellow hair on it, the priest must pronounce the person ceremonially
unclean. It is a scabby sore of the head or chin. If the priest examines the
scabby sore and finds that it is only s­ kin-­deep but there is no black hair
on it, he must quarantine the person for seven days. On the seventh day
the priest must examine the sore again. If he finds that the scabby sore has
not spread, and there is no yellow hair on it, and it appears to be only ­skin-
­deep, the person must shave off all hair except the hair on the affected
area. Then the priest must quarantine the person for another seven days.
On the seventh day he will examine the sore again. If it has not spread
and appears to be no more than ­skin-­deep, the priest will pronounce the
person ceremonially clean. The person’s clothing must be washed, and
the person will be ceremonially clean. But if the scabby sore begins to
spread after the person is pronounced clean, the priest must do another
examination. If he finds that the sore has spread, the priest does not need
to look for yellow hair. The infected person is ceremonially unclean. But
if the color of the scabby sore does not change and black hair has grown
on it, it has healed. The priest will then pronounce the person ceremonially clean.
“If anyone, either a man or woman, has shiny white patches on the skin,
the priest must examine the affected area. If he finds that the shiny patches
are only pale white, this is a harmless skin rash, and the person is ceremonially clean.
“If a man loses his hair and his head becomes bald, he is still ceremonially clean. And if he loses hair on his forehead, he simply has a bald
forehead; he is still clean. However, if a reddish white sore appears on
the bald area on top of his head or on his forehead, this is a skin disease.
The priest must examine him, and if he finds swelling around the reddish
white sore anywhere on the man’s head and it looks like a skin disease, the
man is indeed infected with a skin disease and is unclean. The priest must
pronounce him ceremonially unclean because of the sore on his head.
“Those who suffer from a serious skin disease must tear their clothing and leave their hair uncombed. They must cover their mouth and call
out, ‘Unclean! Unclean!’ As long as the serious disease lasts, they will be





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